Publications

Public-Private Partnerships as an Education Policy Approach: Multiple Meanings, Risks and Challenges

Public-Private Partnerships as an Education Policy Approach: Multiple Meanings, Risks and Challenges

Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly perceived as an innovative approach to provide education for all. Nonetheless, PPP arrangements cover a broad range of policy options and follow diverse rationales, some of which are not necessarily novel within education reform agendas. In education, there are open disputes about the key principles and arrangements that PPPs should have. Overall, PPPs are an ambiguous policy category that allows for a flexible and, sometimes, over-simplified use of the concept. In fact, some important stakeholders narrowly associate PPPs in education to long-known market (or quasi-market) policy solutions. This paper seeks to unpack PPPs both as an analytical category and as a policy generation tool in the education sector, and to reflect on its different translations and implications in key areas such as quality, equity and accountability in education. This paper reviews the origins, core principles and different rationales of PPPs, as well as examines the main challenges and difficulties stemming from the transposition of such arrangements to the field of education policy.

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Tendencias privatizadoras de y en la educación argentina

Tendencias privatizadoras de y en la educación argentina

This report analyses recent trends in privatisation of the education sector in Argentina, such as the use of public funds to subsidise the private sector, the introduction of New Public Management principles, the impact on teacher training and conditions, etc. It also provides a typology of private foundations and firms operating in the sector.

Durante las últimas décadas, las tendencias privatizadoras "de" y "en" la educación proliferaron y ganaron terreno a escala regional y mundial. Este libro analiza por un lado el comportamiento de la matrícula en los últimos años y utilización de los fondos público del Estado para sustentar y dubsidiar al sector privado que desarolla algún tipo de trabajo o actividad en el campo educativo. También se realiza una caracterización de algunas de las empresas y fundaciones con incidencia en el campo educativo para dar cuenta del tipo de actividades que desarollan. Por otro lado, se reflexiona sobre los principios de la Nueva Gestión Pública (NGP) en la educación, identificando las formas que asume la gestión de lo público, en lo que respecta a la importación de formatos pedagógicos, en las alianzas público privado y en los modelos de liderazgo educativo. Se analiza también la presencia de tendencias privatizadoras en la formación y el trabajo docente, en términos de posicionar la mirada y el análisis respecto de nuevos modos de regulación y control de la tarea que disputan la hegemonia en el escenario contemporáneo.

 

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Teachers' and School Heads' Salaries and Allowances in Europe 2015-16

Teachers' and School Heads' Salaries and Allowances in Europe 2015-16

In 2015/16, teachers' statutory salaries increased in the great majority of European countries and remained at about the same level as in 2014/15 in the others. Nevertheless, in most of the countries where the increase took place, it amounted only to 1-4% (Spain and the UK – 1 %, Serbia and Macedonia – 4%), while in some countries the increase was just a compensation for inflation (Germany) or a lagged effect of the reforms implemented several years earlier (Slovakia – reforms in 2009, Hungary – in 2012, Estonia – in 2013). Increase in teachers’ salaries registered by the Eurydice report in 24 European countries is mainly a result of a general salary adjustment for all public employees. The Eurydice report rightly points out that in about 30 out of 40 surveyed countries, the minimum annual statutory salaries for teachers are lower than the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita.

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PPPs and the SDGs: Don’t believe the hype

PPPs and the SDGs: Don’t believe the hype

The advent of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has prompted Public-Private Partnership (PPP) advocates to launch a renewed push for their use in providing network and social infrastructure and services. This briefing suggests that claims that PPPs should be a central part of any attempt to address SDG commitments should be viewed with caution. Prioritisation of PPPs may bias governments towards bankable projects rather than initiatives which best respond to social development objectives. Claims that PPPs are more efficient, better transfer risk and therefore represent better value-for-money are not backed up by the evidence. Finally, particularly where institutional strength is weak, PPPs threaten to undermine democratic accountability and make problems with corruption worse, not better.

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Trends Shaping Education 2016

Trends Shaping Education 2016

This OECD publication provides an overview of key economic, social, demographic and technological trends and raises questions about their potential impact on education: globalisation, climate change, migration, inequality, urbanisation, etc. The first edition was published in 2008 and subsequent editions were released in 2010 and 2013. In this new edition, special emphasis was put on the emerging BRICs economies (Brazil, Russian Federation, India and China).

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The UK’s PPPs Disaster

The UK’s PPPs Disaster

The UK was one of the first countries to develop PPPs in the early 1990s, and its PPP programme, known as the Private Finance Initiative (PFI), subsequently expanded across all parts of public spending including healthcare, education and the military.
This briefing sets out the major problems and risks the UK has encountered through its extensive experiment with PPPs, including how they have cost the government more than if it had funded the public infrastructure by borrowing money itself; led to large windfall gains for the private companies involved, at public expense; led to declining service standards and staffing levels and eroded democratic accountability.
PPPs are hugely unpopular in the UK, which has led to PFI being rebranded in both England and Scotland, and the number and value of new projects falling since 2008, reaching its lowest level since the mid-1990s in 2014 (the latest year with figures available). However, the UK government and companies are now heavily promoting PPPs around the world. In recent years, more than 90 countries around the world have passed laws relating to or enabling PPPs to be taken on.

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Les services de garde au Québec: champ libre au privé

Les services de garde au Québec: champ libre au privé

Les services de garde subventionnés du Québec sont présentement aux prises avec d’importantes compressions budgétaires, qui viennent mettre à mal la qualité des services dispensés. Ce facteur, couplé à la modulation de leur tarification et à la bonification du crédit d’impôt pour frais de garde d’enfants, fait en sorte que de plus en plus de parents se tournent vers les garderies privées. Il s’agit là d’une tendance qui comporte certains risques : d’abord en raison de l’important retard constaté au niveau de la qualité des services au sein des garderies privées non subventionnées, ensuite parce que toute augmentation des coûts liés à ces services peut avoir des impacts négatifs sur la participation des femmes au marché du travail.

The report (in French) analyses privatisation trends in the Early Childhood Education sector in Québec, Canada. Important budgetary cuts in the ECE public sector - which have deteriorated the quality of educational services - and fiscal incentives privileging fee-charging institutions have led many parents to enrol their children in the private sector. The report warns against the poor quality of such structures and the potential negative impact of this policy on women's participation in the labour market.

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Learning to be Watched. Surveillance Culture at School

Learning to be Watched. Surveillance Culture at School

In the United States, schools now routinely direct students online to do their schoolwork; and they collect student data using education and recordkeeping software that is useful to marketers as well—creating a threat to students’ privacy. Schools’ embrace of digital technology augments and amplifies traditional types of education-related marketing, which include: (1) appropriation of space on school property, (2) exclusive agreements, (3) sponsored programs and activities,(4) incentive programs, (5) sponsorship of supplementary educational materials, and (6) fundraising. These marketing efforts, conducted with the implicit blessing of administrators, teachers, and parents, combine to normalize for children the notion that corporations have a legitimate role in their education and in their lives more generally. In addition to threatening children’s right to privacy, these practices raise serious concerns about their effect on children’s physical and psychological well-being and about their impact on the integrity of the education children receive. By engaging in these practices, schools abet the socialization of students as consumers who take for granted that others have a right to keep their behavior under constant surveillance for marketing purposes—even at the cost of their own well-being.
This report considers how schools facilitate the work of digital marketers and examines the effects of their relentless tracking of and marketing to children.

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The Education Deficit

The Education Deficit

Based on research in over 40 countries, this report looks at the key barriers that threaten the right to education today, and the key ways that governments are failing to deliver on core aspects of their right to education obligations. These include ensuring that primary school education is free and compulsory and that secondary education is progressively free and accessible to all children; reducing costs related to education, such as transport; ensuring that schools are free of discrimination, including based on gender, race, and disability; and ensuring schools are free of violence and sexual abuse. It also looks at the main violations and abuses keeping children out of school, including those that occur in global crises, armed conflict—particularly when education is attacked by armed groups,—and forced displacement.

This report finds that many of the same governments that have signed on to development agendas and form part of global partnerships are those that are also failing many of their school-aged children.

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Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform

Teaching Excellence through Professional Learning and Policy Reform

This OECD background report summarises the evidence that underpinned the 2016 International Summit of the Teaching Profession. It develops key topics related to the 2016 theme "Teachers’ professional learning and growth: Creating the conditions to achieve quality teaching for excellent learning outcomes".

It is based on data and comparative analysis from several OECD publications: “How teachers teach and students learn: Strategies for success at school” (forthcoming), Supporting Teacher Professionalism: Insights from TALIS 2013 (2016); TALIS 2013 Results: An International Perspective on Teaching and Learning (2014); Synergies for Better Learning: An International Perspective on Evaluation and Assessment (2013); Creating Effective Teaching and Learning Environments: First Results from TALIS (2009); and Teachers Matter: Attracting, Developing and Retaining Effective Teachers (2005).

Where did equity in education improve over the past decade?

Where did equity in education improve over the past decade?

The persistence of social inequities in education – the fact that children of wealthy and highly educated parents tend to do better in school than children from less privileged families – is often seen as a difficult-to-reverse feature of education systems. Yet countries across the world share the goal of minimising any adverse impact of students’ socio-economic status on their performance in school and over the past decade, equity improved modestly in many PISA-participating countries and economies. This new issue of PISA in Focus analyses where and how.

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All about TISA

All about TISA

What is the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA)? Who is involved? How could TiSA affect governments’ ability to regulate? How TiSA threatens workers’ rights and especially educators? What professional services are covered? To what extent does it open up services procured by governments to global competition? How would public services be affected? These are some of the issues that this ITUC report clarifies. Among other things, it examines the impacts on regulation-making by the Domestic Regulation and the Transparency Annexes. It then analyses the Movement of Natural Persons Annex and its impacts on service workers. It continues with the analysis of the Government Procurement Annex and a general note on the impacts on public services.

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Guide to Human Rights Research & Advocacy on the Role of Private Actors in Education

Guide to Human Rights Research & Advocacy on the Role of Private Actors in Education

This guide provides practical advice on conducting research in order to support human rights advocacy on privatisation in education, using regional and international mechanisms (focusing on UN treaty bodies such as the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and UN Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women): What to research; Where; How to structure the report; etc.

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Gender and EFA 2000-2015: achievements and challenges

Gender and EFA 2000-2015: achievements and challenges

UNESCO and the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI) jointly released a gender summary of the Education for All (EFA) Global Monitoring Report (GMR).
The report shows that fewer than half of countries have achieved gender parity in 2015, leaving sixty-two million girls still being denied their right to a basic education. It tells the story of gender progress over the past 15 years, one of the more positive stories for education since 2000, with 52 million fewer girls out of school and 29 more countries with gender parity now than then. However, there remain persistent barriers to gender parity that have still left fewer than half of countries with gender imbalances in the classroom.

If you don't understand, how can you learn?

If you don't understand, how can you learn?

This new GEM policy paper, released for the International Mother Language Day 2016, reveals that as much as 40% of the global population does not have access to education in a language they speak or understand. The challenges are most prevalent in regions where linguistic diversity is greatest such as in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and the Pacific.

The  paper argues that being taught in a language other than their own can negatively impact children’s learning. According to evidence presented in the report, at least six years of mother tongue instruction is needed to reduce learning gaps for minority language speakers. It shows the importance of teacher training and inclusive supporting materials to improve the learning experience of these children, and provide them with a resilient path of achievement in life.

Poverty and gender amplify educational disadvantages linked to ethnicity and language. With a new global education agenda that prioritizes equity and lifelong learning for all, the policy of respecting language rights is essential and deserves close attention.

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